How old are the pyramids carbon dating

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However, new finds from an early Mayan site called Ceibal in central Guatemala suggest otherwise.

Takeshi Inomata at the University of Arizona in Tuscon and his colleagues have excavated the site, and discovered a small pyramid and several large platforms – including one that is 55 metres long and 1 metre tall – that are unmistakeably similar to those associated with plaza-pyramid architecture at La Venta.

It also suggests that the Pyramid is not the burial place for a king but a centre of power.

It is of no surprise that the Ancient Egyptian section of the Ministry of State of Antiquities vehemently refuted such results, brandishing the archaeologists as “amateurs”, and reemphasising that the Great Pyramid belongs to King Khufu, the second king of the fourth dynasty, and that it was built during his reign to be used as his royal burial place for eternity.

Stepped pyramids and open squares – or plazas – were a feature of many early Mayan sites from around 800 BC.

It is clear to see that apart from Piazzi Smyth (and possibly Proctor), the dates for the creation of the pyramid are all considerably earlier than modern Egyptologists claim.

This is not due to a lack of science or rigor; On the contrary, the Radio-carbon dating at Giza supports the idea that the Great pyramid was built long before it is currently claimed by Egyptologists.

Scientists at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Laboratory of Columbia University at Palisades, N.

Y., reported today in the British journal Nature that some estimates of age based on carbon analyses were wrong by as much as 3,500 years.

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